Families in Ageing Societies

Families in Ageing Societies
A Multi-Disciplinary Approach

The edited collection Families in Ageing Societies was compiled while It was developing the Older People and their Families Research Programme for the Nuffield Foundation. The Foundation wished to fund work that started from the perspectives, needs and interests of the older person and his or her family, and to support an international comparative perspective. The resultant programme focuses on family solidarity and family obligations; caring responsibilities between generations and their implications for the labour market;
legal and social obligations between kin; and the changing relationships emerging within the family forms. Families in Ageing Societies reflects the Nuffield Foundation’s broad and continued interest in these issues. I am grateful to the Foundation for their support in the compilation and editing of this collection, and for their commitment to research into and understanding ageing and later life. List of Contributors
W. Andrew Achenbaum is Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences
at the University of Houston. A historian by background, he has written extensively on the history of ageing within the US, intergenerational relationships,
work, and retirement.
Robert Anderson is co-ordinator of the Living Conditions research programme at the European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and
Working Conditions, an EU agency based in Dublin.
Joanna Bornat is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Health and Social Welfare
at the Open University. She has written extensively on ageing, reminiscence,
and biography.
Brian Dimmock is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Health and Social
Welfare at the Open University, researching the impact of family change on the
lives of older people, with particular interest in stepfamilies.
Janet Finch is Vice-Chancellor of Keele University. A sociologist by background, her research expertise lies principally in studies of family relationships, especially relationships across generations.
Julien Forder is an economist at LSE Health and Social Care, at the London
School of Economics and Political Science. He has research interests in industrial and organizational economics relating to health and social care systems.
Sarah Harper is Director of the Oxford Institute of Ageing, University of
Oxford. She has written extensively on intergenerational relationships and
ageing societies.
Mary Elizabeth Hughes is an Assistant Professor in Sociology at Duke
University. She has particular interest in the relationship between community
characteristics and the individual life course.
Richard W. Johnson is a Research Fellow at the Urban Institute, Washington,
specializing in ageing and health care.
David Jones works in the School of Health and Social Welfare at the Open
University, researching the impact of family change on the lives of older people.
Jeremy Kendall is a Research Fellow at the Personal Social Services Research
Unit at the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research
interests include the mixed economy of social care, the third (or voluntary)
sector in comparative international perspective, and EU public policy and the
third sector.
x List of Contributors
Martin Knapp is Professor of Social Policy at the London School of
Economics, where he directs the Personal Social Services Research Unit, and
co-Director of LSE Health and Social Care. He is also Professor of Health
Economics at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College, London, where he is
Director of the Centre for the Economics of Mental Health.
Frieder R. Lang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Education at
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin with research interests in the psychology of
ageing.
Anthony T. Lo Sasso is a Research Associate Professor at the Institute for
Health Services Research and Policy Studies, Northwestern University. He has
particular interests in long-term care, ageing, and intergenerational impacts.
Mike Murphy is a Professor in the Department of Social Policy at the London
School of Economics, specializing in the causes and consequences of population change in Britain and other western societies; intergenerational relations;
and household and family formation methods.
Sheila Peace is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Health and Social Welfare at
the Open University. She has particular research interests in environment and
identity, and the impact of family change on older people’s lives.
Linda Pickard is a Research Officer at the Personal Social Services Research
Unit at the London School of Economics. She currently works on the PSSRU
project concerned with demand for long-term care for older people over the
next thirty years, with a particular interest in informal care.
Linda J. Waite is the Lucy Flower Professor in Urban Sociology at the
University of Chicago, and the Director of the NIA Center on the Demography
and Economics of Aging. Her current research interests include the family,
especially working families, cohabitation, marriage and divorce, ageing, and
the labour force

Sarah Harper
Oxford
May 2003

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A Multi-Disciplinary Approach PDF – Click Here

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